IBM’s Strategy Director on Lessons from Black Friday

Even though from the IBM director’s viewpoint, this holds a lot of lessons for any retailer and on line merchant.  I think thre area several lessons here for us and would like to bring this into our discussions.

IBM’s Strategy Director on Lessons from Black Friday | Promotional Marketing content from Chief Marketer.

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Anna Wintour: beneath the bob

Anna Wintour: beneath the bob – Telegraph.

Key Quotation (for now)>

One of fashion’s most potent recent shifts, she says, has been its democratisation: “Fashion today is available to everybody in a way that it’s never been before: you’ve got every designer you’ve ever heard of working for H&M or Target. That’s fantastic.” Key to this, she believes, has been Michelle Obama, for whose husband Wintour has been a prominent fundraiser. “Look back at the history of First Ladies and you’ll see they wore a good suit or a ball gown. Now we have someone who wears J.Crew or Thakoon or Azzedine Alaïa: a gamut of different designers. She has changed the way American women see fashion.”

How Zara Grew Into the World’s Largest Fashion Retailer

Absolutely required reading. We may just have to throw out the textbook at this point and devote the rest of the class to Chris Anderson and this article… (Am I kidding?)

How Zara Grew Into the World’s Largest Fashion Retailer – NYTimes.com.

 

This caught my eye – what with my interest in sustainability…

“The reality is: a T-shirt is a T-shirt is a T-shirt,” Golsorkhi says. “It costs the planet the same thing whether you have paid £200 for it or £1 for it. It does the same amount of damage. A T-shirt is equivalent to 700 gallons of water, gallons of chemical waste, so much human labor. But it used to be that we could do with three T-shirts a year. Now we need 30. Sometimes it’s actually cheaper to throw away clothes than to wash them. That has got to be wrong.”

It also may not be good for business in the long run.

“Eventually, there aren’t going to be resources to sustain fast fashion, so to me it seems to be a very vulnerable business model,” says Alex McIntosh, the business and research manager at the London College of Fashion’s Center for Sustainable Fashion. “Production costs will also get more expensive, and they won’t be able to keep this up. Value-based companies don’t have margins to absorb that additional cost. And then they will need to convince customers to spend more for clothes again.”

The Long View | Chris Anderson Says the ‘Maker’ Movement is the Next Industrial Revolution | BoF – The Business of Fashion

An interview with Chris Anderson. He has a vision of de-centralized design and production: The “Maker” movement. I’m very tempted to throw our schedule out the window to discuss this…

The Long View | Chris Anderson Says the ‘Maker’ Movement is the Next Industrial Revolution | BoF – The Business of Fashion.